Getting Better Image Quality With TinyPNG

I’m super excited because I recently came across a free resource that has helped me tremendously. Feel free to make fun of me if you’ve known about it all along, and I’m just now finding out about it. I’ll just be mad at you for not letting me in on this little handy tool! Okay, I think I’ve built it up enough. I recently discovered TinyPNG. It is a smart png and jpeg compression website that optimizes the images you use for web. Yes, you can optimize your images in Photoshop, but I haven’t found a way to do it that reduces the file size as much as TinyPNG does while keeping the quality high. I don’t know how they do it (magic?), but the way the website explains it is “TinyPNG uses smart lossy compression techniques to reduce the file size of your PNG files. By selectively decreasing the number of colors in the image, fewer bytes are required to store the data. The effect is nearly invisible but it makes a very large difference in file size!”

So what are some examples of how I utilize TinyPNG? The main reason I needed a tool like this is because I design and post a lot of social graphics to Facebook and Instagram. As you may know, both of those platforms like to compress the images of bigger file sizes causing a loss of quality. With the popularity in high resolution screens now, many graphics I’ve normally created at 600px by 600px show up small and/or pixelated on those screens. I wanted to increase the size to 1200px by 1200px, but that made the file size so big that Facebook and Instagram end up compressing it which causes loss of quality. Now that I have found TinyPNG, I can use the 1200px by 1200px graphic on social media without it being compressed by those platforms because this file actually ends up being a smaller file size than the original 600px by 600px that wasn’t optimized by TinyPNG. See the examples below.

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Another HUGE and beneficial way I have used TinyPNG is for images on a website. We’ve had issues at work before with pages loading slowly, and we have discovered that it is due to the large file size of the images. By compressing them with TinyPNG we are able to reduce the file sizes by an average of 75%! It’s a wonder how we went so long without using TinyPNG.

So to conclude this blog post, I’d like to say YOU’RE WELCOME. And if you already use TinyPNG, how has it been working out for you? Do you use the plugin? If so, is it worth the $50? Let me know!